25 New Year's Resolutions for Co-Parents

25 New Year's Resolutions for Co-Parents

Anyone who is transitioning through a separation - or has already separated - knows that during this time, emotions run high and feelings can get low. This is especially true when children are involved, and heightened even more during times like the holidays and special events. So how can we get our fellow co-parent to cooperate with us? It may start with you. Here are 25 ideas that can even be implemented as your New Year’s resolutions.

How to Change the World in 3 Simple Steps

How to Change the World in 3 Simple Steps

It’s easy to get overwhelmed and heavy-hearted in the current political, environmental, spiritual, and social climate.  Yet, conflict is one of the greatest methods of learning. Let’s also learn from the disruptive technology of mediation when we look for solutions to those conflicts. When it comes to expanding ourselves, connecting and healing, we need new strategies. Here are three of them.

How To Consider Another Point Of View

How To Consider Another Point Of View

Recently, I was talking with a client about learning to co-parent with his former wife against all the odds. Like many parenting coordination clients, the years since their divorce had only increased their antipathy for one another. But, One of the many gifts of my profession is that I am reminded almost daily that when two parents come together to decide something for their child, they generally make a better decision than either one could decide individually.

10 Quotes To Live By

10 Quotes To Live By

As we wade through uncharted territory like separation or parenting coordination, everyone - at some point - could use a little pick-me-up. Whether you're struggling with confidence or feeling a little down from stress, these motivational quotes might help shine a light on the other side.

Dealing with the Trauma of Divorce or Separation

Dealing with the Trauma of Divorce or Separation

As I wrapped up a particularly emotional mediation recently, I urged my clients to take good care of themselves and to make an effort to heal and restore in the subsequent weeks.  This is more than an encouraging platitude at the end of a tough session.  I often say this to people in the course of separation or intense co-parenting disputes because their circumstances are traumatic.  Literally.  Intense fighting, being left by the person you have built a trusting relationship with, losing daily contact with your children or financial and legal anxieties create trauma that gets stored in the body.  And that can come back to haunt us individually and in our co-parenting relationship for years if we don’t address it.